Download A Dictionary of Literary Symbols (2001) by Michael Ferber PDF

By Michael Ferber

This is often the 1st dictionary of symbols to be according to literature, instead of "universal" pyschological archetypes, myths or esoterica. Michael Ferber has assembled approximately 200 major entries essentially explaining and illustrating the literary symbols that all of us stumble upon (such as swan, rose, moon, gold), in addition to enormous quantities of cross-references and quotations. The dictionary concentrates on English literature, yet its entries diversity extensively from the Bible and classical authors to the 20th century, taking in American and eu literatures. Its proficient type and wealthy references will make this e-book a necessary device not just for literary and classical students, yet for all scholars of literature.

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In Christian color-symbolism blue belongs to the Virgin. 14). For Shelley, the two hues that nature has made divine are “Green strength, azure hope” (“Ode: Arise” 33). In Chaucer’s “Against Women Unconstant” the refrain is “Instead of blue, thus may ye wear all green” – the blue of constancy, the green of the changeable earth. ) It is so common to see “blue” or “azure” before “sky” or “heaven” – Shakespeare has “blue of heaven,”“aerial blue,” and “azured vault,” Wordsworth has “clear blue sky,”“azure heavens” and “blue 31 Blue firmament” – that it takes a feat of phrasing to bring home the blueness and its symbolic resonance.

God tells Noah, “Whoso sheddeth man’s blood, by man shall his blood be shed” (Gen. “It is law,” a chorus of Aeschylus sings, “that bloody drops spilling into the ground demand more blood” (Choephoroe 400–02). 121–22). 20). The faithful are “justified by his blood” (Rom. 9); in him “we have redemption through his blood” (Eph. 7). The redeemed in heaven wear white robes, for “they have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb” (Rev. 14). 2–3). See Purple. “Blue! – ’Tis the life of heaven – the domain / Of Cynthia,” Keats begins a sonnet; “Blue!

430–36, trans. Fitzgerald). Shakespeare draws largely from the Georgics in Canterbury’s speech about the division of human labor: “for so work the honey-bees, / Creatures that by a rule in nature teach / The act of order to a peopled kingdom. 187–204). 20). Bees were often thought of as particularly warlike and their hive as organized like an army. 87–90), as does another simile in Aeschylus’ Persians (126–30). Three of the four times bees are mentioned in the Old Testament, they are associated with armies of enemies (Deut.

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