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By Julie Coleman

This booklet keeps Julie Coleman's acclaimed heritage of dictionaries of English slang and cant. It describes the more and more systematic and scholarly manner during which such phrases have been recorded and categorized within the united kingdom, the us, Australia, and in different places, and the large development within the ebook of and public urge for food for dictionaries, glossaries, and publications to the detailed vocabularies of alternative social teams, periods, districts, areas, and international locations. Dr Coleman describes the origins of phrases and words and explores their background. by means of copious instance she indicates how they forged gentle on daily life around the globe - from settlers in Canada and Australia and cockneys in London to gang-members in long island and infantrymen struggling with within the Boer and primary international Wars - in addition to at the operations of the narcotics alternate and the leisure enterprise and the lives of these attending American schools and British public schools.The slang lexicographers have been a colorful bunch. these featured during this booklet contain spiritualists, aristocrats, socialists, newshounds, psychiatrists, school-boys, criminals, hoboes, cops, and a serial bigamist. One supplied the muse for Robert Lewis Stevenson's lengthy John Silver. one other was once allegedly killed through a red meat pie. Julie Coleman's account will curiosity historians of language, crime, poverty, sexuality, and the legal underworld.

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Extra resources for A History of Cant and Slang Dictionaries: Volume III: 1859-1936

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Haven’t . . Hotten also began to enclose phrasal headwords within quotation marks and to capitalize usage labels: “ADMIRAL OF THE RED,” a person whose very red face evinces a fondness for strong potations. DIDDLE, old Cant [1860: cant] word for geneva, or gin. More radical editing included updating content, and correcting inaccuracies: Hotten (1860) BURKE, to kill, to murder, by pitch plaster or other foul means. From Burke, the notorious Whitechapel murderer, who with others used to waylay people, kill them, and sell their bodies for dissection at the hospitals.

Trousers, pronounced trouses. Th. Hotten (1859) JENNY LINDER, a winder, — vulgar pronunciation of window. ROUND THE HOUSES, trouses, — vulgar pronunciation of trousers. 8 Pierce Egan, Grose’s Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue. Revised and Corrected. With the Addition of numerous Slang Phrases, collected from tried authorities (London: Printed for the Editor, 1823). e. the chance of their occurrence by random variation is less than 1 per cent). 9 Hotten, Dictionary, 1859, 153. Ducange Anglicus, The Vulgar Tongue, Comprising Two Glossaries of Slang, Cant, and Flash Words and Phrases used in London at the Present Day (London: Bernard Quaritch, 1857).

Hotten] collects unsifted information, trustworthy in very various degrees . . and . . 11 This is an entirely fair assessment. Hotten was unfortunate in producing his dictionary at a time when reviewers expected more than an amateur compilation from earlier sources. Readers, it appears, were more easily satisfied. The second edition of Hotten’s Slang Dictionary (1860) The first edition of the dictionary was quickly sold out,12 and the following year Hotten issued a second edition, retitled The Slang Dictionary Etymological, Historical, and Anecdotal: A Second Edition, although urgently called for, was not immediately attempted.

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